Book Review || “The Skinny Rules” By Bob Harper – Chapters 14-16

Chapter / Rule 14 – Eat A Real Breakfast

More studies showing that health-conscious people eat breakfast and thus weigh less.  People who don’t eat breakfast usually don’t do it intentionally for health reasons, and are more likely to be less concerned about health, thus weigh more.

I’ll quote myself from a previous review:

Moral: “You do not have to eat breakfast.  It does not ‘jumpstart‘ your metabolism.  You do not have to eat breakfast.”

Chapter / Rule 15 – Make your own food and eat at least ten meals a week at home

Not totally bad advice, and typically something that I can get behind.

Typically cooking your own meals is cheaper, it’s easier to control what goes into your food, and usually (though of course, not always) you’ll be eating less calories than if you got some fast food.

However, once again, it’s not absolutely, utterly necessary to lose weight.

Mmmm Chipotle Burrito Bowl. Delicious, completely compatible with a weight-loss focused diet, and also happens to be fast food. Woo! (taken from livingtherun.com)

As well, a significant portion of the obese and overweight population live in areas with a distinct lack of access to grocery stores, cookware, and decent kitchen facilities.  As well, one shouldn’t discount the fact that, especially if you’re inexperienced, cooking takes time.  It’s the time to get to the grocery store, pick out your groceries, store them, cook them, and clean up after them, as well as put away any leftovers.  Is it so hard to see why someone working 80 hours a week would be disinclined?  Does it make them doomed to be fat forever?

Other than that, I generally like this chapter.  While I don’t do it, eating only at the table is good habit to have, and he gives a pretty good list of basic cookware that you’ll need.

Moral: It’s probably easier to lose weight eating mostly from home.  It’s also typically cheaper.  However, it’s not absolutely required.

Chapter / Rule 16 – Banish High-Salt Foods

Harper is correct about one thing.  Salt can cause water retention, which can create some serious scale fluctuations which many dieters may find discouraging.  However, I think this is one of many reasons that the scale is not a good way to measure body recomposition progress.

However, as far as salt being bad for you, unless you already have blood-pressure issues, you really need not concern yourself with how much sodium you’re taking in.  In any case, if you’ve been following his advice of not eating fast food, you’ll probably be fine.   I do think American cuisine could use a bit more when it comes to herbs and spices, though.  Salt, pepper and garlic powder aren’t the only things out there!

Basil, oregano, Italian seasoning, cumin, curry powder, ginger, rosemary or chili powder are some of my favorites.  (I have no idea of their sodium content, however!)

Moral: Unless you have an existing blood-pressure condition, don’t sweat your sodium content.  I would encourage experimenting with new spices and herbs however!

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About katwhit

Coffee shop blogger by day, personal trainer by night. My interests include lifting weights, puppies, teaching people how to lift weights and dogs. Head on over to my blog and you'll find: reviews of best-selling diet books in extensive detail, critiques of various fitness publications, and even the occasional rant on the latest TV fitness segments.
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